Why TS Birds

Birds across Europe and the UK are dwindling in number because birds face man-made perils throughout their migration route and then arrive at their wintering destinations in Africa to an ever decreasing area of forest or suitable habitat in which to feed and shelter for several months.

Why are our birds disappearing?
What can we do?

02

OUR BIRDS ARE DISAPPEARING

Birds are vital to the natural ecosystem in which man lives. Now human population growth, behaviour and consumption of natural resources has unbalanced this eco system.

03

MIGRATING PERILS

Trans-Sahara migrating birds face man-made perils throughout their migration route and then arrive at their wintering destinations in Africa to an ever decreasing area of forest or suitable habitat in which to feed and shelter.

04

BOB SCOTT MEMORIAL APPEAL

Vast areas, once left as wild forest, are now under the plough often for very short term food gain. Trees are cleared and soils depleted leaving the area useless. The BSMA is buying up forest land to prevent this.

The Kirosa Scott Reserve

Bob Scott spent his life trying to raise awareness and interest in birds and the need to protect them and the habitats in which they live. The memorial appeal is raising money to continue this mission by purchasing more land to expand an area of sanctuary in the Dakatcha Forest, Kenya, now known as the Kirosa Scott Reserve which was originally bought in his memory.

Damage to habitats

Our Birds

These are just a few of the birds under threat from migration habitat destruction, taken by friends of the BSMA. Click for larger images.

The Bob Scott Memorial Appeal is working to save the habitats of these Trans-Sahara migrating birds so that we can stop their declining numbers and enjoy them in Europe and the UK.

Make A Donation

The Bob Scott Memorial Appeal is raising funds to purchase & protect forest habitat of Trans-Sahara migrating birds.

The Dakatcha Forest was part of the ancient forest of Arabuko, which once stretched from the Somalian border down through Kenya into Tanzania, finishing level with Madagascar. Now in Kenya apart from one block of just over 400 square kilometres only remnants remain one such being the Dakatcha Forest.

The healthy forest areas support a wide variety of wildlife; the areas devastated by humans are devoid of cover, fauna and insects for food. The BSMA is purchasing areas of ‘good, relatively undamaged forest’ as well as areas that can be replanted to recover over time.

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